Courses - Faculty of Arts


Philosophy

Stage I

PHIL 100
15 Points

Mind, Knowledge, and Reality

Metaphysics deals with fundamental problems about the nature of the world and human beings, for example, questions about the existence of God, the nature of time, the relationship between mind and body and the nature of identity and the self. The theory of knowledge studies the sources, limits and justification of human knowledge and understanding as distinct from opinion or belief.

PHIL 101
15 Points

Introduction to Logic

Logic is the study of argument. This course aims to provide an understanding of central logical notions, such as consistency and inconsistency, logical truth, and, most importantly, what it means for an argument to be valid or invalid, sound or unsound. The course examines two main logical systems, propositional and predicate logic, and shows how these formal systems are used to analyse and evaluate arguments.

PHIL 102
15 Points

Introduction to Ethics

The philosophical study of ethics provides theoretical frameworks for thinking about questions such as 'What makes an action right or wrong?', and 'What kind of person should I try to be?' Several theories will be explored, evaluated, and applied to practical moral issues such as abortion, our treatment of other animals, tolerance regarding cultural differences, and obligations to future generations.

Restriction: HLTHPSYC 102, PSYCHIAT 102

PHIL 103
15 Points

Freedom, Rights and Justice

Considers various questions concerning the relation between individuals and political communities such as: What principles of justice should communities adopt? What are rights? What limits can legitimately be placed on individual liberty? What is the source and nature of citizens' obligations to obey the law? What makes a decision procedure democratic and why does it matter? These questions are considered in relation to the New Zealand context.

PHIL 105
15 Points

PHIL 105G
15 Points

Critical Thinking

Dialogue, argument and discussion are analysed. Distinctions are drawn between persuasive, logically good and materially good arguments. The focus is on well reasoned persuasive dialogue, and mistakes in persuasive reasoning. Topics include the point of an argument, strength of arguments, fallacious reasoning, relevance of reasons, and burden of proof.

PHIL 152
15 Points

Philosophy and Theories of Human Nature

What is human nature? The course covers competing conceptions of human nature, found in religious, philosophical and political thought, alongside theories that deny the existence of a human nature. Philosophers discussed may include: Aristotle, Descartes, Nietzsche, Plato, Hobbes, Marx, Sartre and Christian thinkers.

Stage II

PHIL 200
15 Points

Philosophy of Mind

There are many philosophical problems concerning mental lives (in particular, human mental lives), how they are constituted, and what makes them possible – problems which have generated a vast literature and diverse important philosophical theories. Theories introduced and critically examined will include dualisms, but will mainly comprise forms of physicalism such as philosophical behaviourism, the identity theory and especially functionalist theories.

Prerequisite: 30 points in Philosophy or 60 points

Restriction: PHIL 320

PHIL 202
15 Points

Philosophy of Language

The components of language and its use (expressions, utterances, speech acts etc); theories of language and its nature (including structuralism, Chomskyan psychologism and platonism); linguistic meaning and its connection with other sorts of meaning (Grice on meaning, sense and reference, truth-conditional theories of meaning etc); the connection between language, thought and reality.

Prerequisite: 30 points in Philosophy or Linguistics

Restriction: PHIL 322

PHIL 204
15 Points

Greek Philosophy

An introduction to some of the important figures in ancient philosophy and the issues with which they were concerned. The work of the Presocratics, Plato, and Aristotle will be explored, with a detailed discussion of the philosophical system of either Plato or Aristotle and its importance in the history of philosophy.

Prerequisite: 30 points in Philosophy, or EUROPEAN 100 and 15 points in Philosophy

PHIL 205
15 Points

Community, Society and Rights

Addresses a variety of topics in political philosophy such as: the political theories of Locke and Hobbes; the nature of rights and rights-holders; sovereignty; strategies for securing stable and just societies between people with significantly different moral, political and cultural views; and the relationship between individuals and communities. Topics will be related to contemporary political issues in New Zealand and, in particular, to the Treaty of Waitangi.

Prerequisite: 30 points in Philosophy or Political Studies or Politics and International Relations

PHIL 207
15 Points

Philosophy of Religion

A study of the relationship between reason and faith; is belief in the Judaeo-Christian God reasonable? Topics include: the problem of evil, the meaningfulness of religious language, alternative concepts of God, Hume on miracles, and Kierkegaard and William James on faith and reason.

Prerequisite: 30 points in Philosophy

Restriction: PHIL 327

PHIL 209
15 Points

Schopenhauer and Nietzsche

A study of the philosophies of Arthur Schopenhauer (1788-1860) and Friedrich Nietzsche (1844-1900), focusing on their respective attitudes towards the value of life and the meaning of suffering. Schopenhauer's emphasis upon transcendent modes of awareness will be compared with Nietzsche's more down-to-earth existentialism, in light of their views on the redeeming value of artistic and aesthetic experience.

Prerequisite: 30 points in Philosophy or EUROPEAN 100 and 15 points in Philosophy

Restriction: PHIL 329

PHIL 210
15 Points

Applied Ethics

Philosophical analysis and discussion of contemporary moral issues, such as abortion, euthanasia, reverse discrimination, sex work, punishment and the ethics of charity.

Prerequisite: PHIL 102 or PSYCHIAT 102 or HLTHPSYC 102 or 30 points in Philosophy, or 30 points at Stage I in Social Science for Public Health

Restriction: PHIL 313

PHIL 211
15 Points

Ethical Theory 2

Philosophical study of moral theory, in both normative ethics and meta-ethics. Topics covered include: theories of value, theories of right action, and the status and justification of such theories.

Prerequisite: 30 points in Philosophy

PHIL 212
15 Points

Philosophy of the Arts

Considers a range of issues debated by contemporary philosophers concerning the origins, function, definition, ontology, presentation, interpretation, appreciation, expressiveness, representational character, and value of art. Related and applied topics, such as the status of colourised movies, the status of artistic fakes, and the paradox of our enjoying tragedies are also discussed.

Prerequisite: 30 points in Philosophy or 90 points

Restriction: PHIL 332

PHIL 214
15 Points

Classical Chinese Philosophy

An introduction to the philosophical thought of pre-imperial China, which forms the intellectual foundation for almost all subsequent developments in Chinese philosophy and much of Chinese culture in general. Texts studied, in translation, will include the Analects of Confucius, Mozi, Mencius, the Daodejing of Laozi, Zhuangzi, Xunzi, and Hanfeizi.

Prerequisite: 30 points in Philosophy or 15 points from ASIAN 100, CHINESE 130, JAPANESE 150 or KOREAN 120

Restriction: PHIL 334

PHIL 215
15 Points

20th Century French Philosophy

An examination of the development of contemporary French philosophy through the intellectual movements of Existentialism, Phenomenology, Structuralism and Post-Structuralism.

Prerequisite: 30 points in Philosophy or EUROPEAN 100 and 15 points in Philosophy

Restriction: PHIL 335

PHIL 216
15 Points

Modal Logic

An introduction to modal logic, which is a variation of the system of predicate logic studied in PHIL 101. Modal logic is well-suited for studying philosophically important concepts such as necessity, time, knowledge, vagueness, action and obligation. It is also used in computer science for studying the behaviour of programs and is recommended as preparation for studying logic at Stage III.

Prerequisite: PHIL 101

PHIL 217
15 Points

Philosophy of Law

Themes in contemporary Western philosophy of law, relating to debates between liberal and non-liberal conceptions of law, including questions about the nature of legal rules, legal reasons and the relationship between law and morality. Major positions in legal theory will be covered, from legal positivism to critical legal studies.

Prerequisite: 30 points in Philosophy or 90 points

Restriction: PHIL 337

PHIL 218
15 Points

Problems in Epistemology

Epistemology is the study of knowledge, rationality, belief and related topics. This course will give an overview of epistemology but will focus on three main issues: foundationalism versus coherentism, internalism versus externalism and replies to scepticism.

Prerequisite: 30 points in Philosophy

Restriction: PHIL 338

PHIL 220
15 Points

Kant and Hegel

An examination of the development of German idealism from Kant to Hegel, focusing on Kant's Critique of Pure Reason (1781-1787) and Hegel's Phenomenology of Spirit (1807).

Prerequisite: 30 points in Philosophy

Restriction: PHIL 340

PHIL 221
15 Points

Phenomenology and Hermeneutics

Examines two waves of new philosophical thought that originated in Germany in the early twentieth century and gradually spread throughout the world: phenomenology and hermeneutics. Discusses key figures in these movements including Husserl, Heidegger and Gadamer, as well as a selection of others such as Dilthey, Merleau-Ponty, Levinas, Ricoeur, Habermas, Apel, Taylor or Rorty.

Prerequisite: 30 points in Philosophy or EUROPEAN 100 and 15 points in Philosophy

Restriction: PHIL 341

PHIL 222
15 Points

Intermediate Logic

Natural deduction for propositional and predicate logic; introductory metalogic and related topics in formal logic.

Prerequisite: PHIL 101

Restriction: PHIL 201

PHIL 224
15 Points

Buddhist Philosophy

An introduction to the Buddhist tradition of philosophy, from the teachings of the Buddha to Abhidharma, Madhyamaka, Yogacara (in India, South East Asia and Tibet) and finally to Chan (China) and Zen (Japan).

Prerequisite: 30 points in Philosophy or 15 points from ASIAN 100, CHINESE 130, JAPANESE 150 or KOREAN 120

Restriction: PHIL 344

PHIL 225
15 Points

Power, Critique and Emancipation

An examination of support for political struggles for freedom, justice and recognition through the philosophical critique of modern society. Topics include science and technology, bureaucratisation, social control, social alienation, mass communication, the commodification of culture, and the idea of critique. Theorists may include Horkheimer, Adorno, Marcuse, Benjamin, Arendt, Habermas and Honneth.

Prerequisite: 30 points in Philosophy

Restriction: PHIL 345

PHIL 226
15 Points

Special Topic

PHIL 228
15 Points

Special Topic: Philosophy of Atheism

Atheism has a long history of opposition to supernatural religion. Philosophy of Atheism explores this conflict along with: views of ourselves and the world once the God hypothesis is abandoned, the idea of an enlightened humanism, the nature of secularism, the rivalry between scientific and religious world views, and naturalistic explanations of religious belief.

Prerequisite: 30 points at Stage I in Philosophy or Theology or Theological and Religious Studies

Restriction: PHIL 348

PHIL 229
15 Points

Special Topic

PHIL 230
15 Points

Special Topic

PHIL 250
15 Points

Philosophy and the Environment

Philosophical questions relating to the environment and our use of it, such as the following: Do we have obligations to future generations, especially concerning preservation of the environment? What are our moral and epistemic responsibilities regarding climate change and other environmental issues? Does nature have intrinsic value? Is it better to live in a natural world or a virtual world.

Prerequisite: 30 points in Philosophy or 60 points

Restriction: PHIL 351

PHIL 260
15 Points

Philosophy of Science

What makes science a distinctive way of discovering knowledge about our world whether natural, biological or social? Ever since science started in Ancient Greece, a number of different theories about the worldview, methods and rationality of science have been proposed that distinguish it from religion, pseudo-science and myth. The course examines some of these accounts of the nature of science.

Prerequisite: 30 points in Philosophy or 60 points

Restriction: PHIL 360

PHIL 261
15 Points

Metaphysical Structures of the World

Metaphysics attempts to give a quite general picture of the nature and structure of the world, and particularly investigates philosophical problems which thereby arise. Science, common sense, religions and cultures all presuppose metaphysical worldviews. Traditional metaphysical problems concern laws, causation, time, space, substance, identity, attributes and universals, free will, reality, existence etc. Course topics will be selected from such traditional problems.

Prerequisite: 30 points in Philosophy or 60 points

Restriction: PHIL 361

PHIL 263
15 Points

Philosophy of Biology

Examines philosophical and conceptual issues in the life sciences. Topics may include the units and levels of selection, adaptationism, the evolution of altruism, biology and ethics, sociobiology and evolutionary psychology, cultural evolution, evolution versus creationism, and the origin and nature of life.

Prerequisite: 30 points in Philosophy or 60 points

Restriction: PHIL 363

PHIL 266
15 Points

Games, Rationality and Choice

Are our decisions a matter of reason alone? How are they influenced by others? And can we reason about what others believe about us? The course introduces some ideas from the logic of preference, decision theory, game theory, probability, and models of belief dynamics. It is a practical course of formal methods for philosophy students, with an emphasis on applications.

Prerequisite: 30 points in Philosophy or PHIL 101 or 105

PHIL 267
15 Points

From Descartes to Hume

Examines important developments in seventeenth and eighteenth-century philosophy. It will look at refinements in philosophical methodology during this period and their impact on metaphysics, epistemology, philosophy of mind, and ethics.

Prerequisite: 30 points in Philosophy, or EUROPEAN 100 and 15 points in Philosophy

Restriction: PHIL 208, 309, 328

Stage III

PHIL 301
15 Points

Philosophy for Children

Provides a thorough practical grounding in facilitation of philosophical communities of inquiry, and in the construction of materials to stimulate philosophical inquiry. Opportunities for classroom practice in co-operating primary schools will be provided to participants who are not classroom-based.

Prerequisite: 60 points in Philosophy

Restriction: PHIL 701

PHIL 302
15 Points

Medieval Philosophy

A detailed introduction to either the work of a leading medieval philosopher, for example Augustine, Abaelard, Scotus or Ockham, or to one or more of the topics which were of interest to medieval philosophers. The course aims to show how understanding medieval philosophy is essential for the history of Christian thought and philosophy up to modern times.

Prerequisite: 30 points at Stage II in Philosophy, or EUROPEAN 100 and 15 points at Stage II in Philosophy

PHIL 304
15 Points

Virtue Theory

How should we live? One approach to answering this question focuses on the traits of character that contribute to a well-lived life, including qualities like courage, wisdom, generosity, and perseverance. Theories that take this approach are known as virtue theories. This course will look at important examples of virtue theory.

Prerequisite: Either 30 points at Stage II in Philosophy including PHIL 205 or 210 or 211 or 250, or PHIL 102 and 30 points at Stage II in Philosophy

PHIL 305
15 Points

Advanced Logic

The techniques and philosophical significance of modern logical theory, including some model theory, proof theory, set theory and recursion theory. The main objective is to provide a level of understanding of these topics sufficient for an appreciation of Godel's celebrated proof of the incompleteness of arithmetic.

Prerequisite: PHIL 222

PHIL 306
15 Points

Language, Truth and Meaning

Examines the relationship between language, thought, and reality. Topics include the nature of existence and nonexistence; the linguistic turn in analytic philosophy; theories of reference, meaning, and truth; the relation between meaning, necessity, and the a priori; scepticism about meaning and reference. (PHIL 101 offers useful background, but the course is intended to be accessible to students without a formal background in logic.)

Prerequisite: 30 points at Stage II in Philosophy

PHIL 307
15 Points

Special Topic

Prerequisite: 30 points at Stage II in Philosophy

PHIL 308
15 Points

Special Topic

Prerequisite: 30 points at Stage II in Philosophy

PHIL 309
15 Points

From Descartes to Hume

Examines important developments in seventeenth and eighteenth-century philosophy. It will look at refinements in philosophical methodology during this period and their impact on metaphysics, epistemology, philosophy of mind, and ethics.

Prerequisite: 30 points at Stage II in Philosophy, or EUROPEAN 100 and 15 points at Stage II in Philosophy

Restriction: PHIL 208, 267, 328

PHIL 310
15 Points

Political Philosophy 3

Advanced topics in Political Philosophy.

Prerequisite: 30 points at Stage II in Philosophy or Political Studies or Politics and International Relations

PHIL 313
15 Points

Special Topic

Prerequisite: 30 points at Stage II in Philosophy, or 30 points at Stage II in Social Science for Public Health

Restriction: PHIL 210

PHIL 315
15 Points

Topics in Applied Logic

A selection of topics in applied logic such as: modal logic (the logic of necessity and possibility), temporal logic (the logic of time), dynamic logic (the logic of change), and epistemic logic (the logic of knowledge and belief, including the logic of belief revision).

Prerequisite: 15 points from PHIL 222, 216 or 266

PHIL 318
15 Points

Theory of Applied and Professional Ethics

The application of ethical theory to applied and professional ethics, including topics such as: the role of principles in applied and professional ethics, ethical expertise, role ethics, dialogue ethics, the ethics of care, ethical issues that arise in professional practice.

Prerequisite: Either 30 points at Stage II in Philosophy including PHIL 205 or 210 or 211 or 250, or PHIL 102 and 30 points at Stage II in Philosophy

PHIL 320
15 Points

Philosophy of Mind

There are many philosophical problems concerning mental lives (in particular, human mental lives), how they are constituted, and what makes them possible – problems which have generated a vast literature and diverse important philosophical theories. Theories introduced and critically examined will include dualisms, but will mainly comprise forms of physicalism such as philosophical behaviourism, the identity theory and especially functionalist theories.

Prerequisite: 30 points at Stage II in Philosophy or 30 points from HISTORY 240, PHIL 260, SCIGEN 201

Restriction: PHIL 200

PHIL 322
15 Points

Philosophy of Language

The components of language and its use (expressions, utterances, speech acts); theories of language and its nature (including structuralism, Chomskyan psychologism and platonism); linguistic meaning and its connection with other sorts of meaning (Grice on meaning, sense and reference, truth-conditional theories of meaning); the connection between language, thought and reality.

Prerequisite: 30 points at Stage II in Philosophy or 30 points at Stage II in Linguistics

Restriction: PHIL 202

PHIL 323
15 Points

Philosophy of Logic

An introduction to philosophical logic, covering at least three of the following topics: use and mention, language and logic, argumentation theory, propositions and sentences, conditionals, disjunctions, and existence and quantification.

Prerequisite: PHIL 222

Restriction: PHIL 223

PHIL 327
15 Points

Philosophy of Religion

A study of the relationship between reason and faith; is belief in the Judaeo-Christian God reasonable? Topics include: the problem of evil, the meaningfulness of religious language, alternative concepts of God, Hume on miracles and Kierkegaard and William James on faith and reason.

Prerequisite: 30 points at Stage II in Philosophy

Restriction: PHIL 207

PHIL 329
15 Points

Schopenhauer and Nietzsche

A study of the philosophies of Arthur Schopenhauer (1788-1860) and Friedrich Nietzsche (1844-1900), focusing on their respective attitudes towards the value of life and the meaning of suffering. Schopenhauer's emphasis upon transcendent modes of awareness will be compared with Nietzsche's more down-to-earth existentialism, in light of their views on the redeeming value of artistic and aesthetic experience.

Prerequisite: 30 points at Stage II in Philosophy, or EUROPEAN 100 and 15 points at Stage II in Philosophy

Restriction: PHIL 209

PHIL 332
15 Points

Philosophy of the Arts

Considers a range of issues debated by contemporary philosophers concerning the origins, function, definition, ontology, presentation, interpretation, appreciation, expressiveness, representational character, and value of art. Related and applied topics, such as the status of colourised movies, the status of artistic fakes, and the paradox of our enjoying tragedies are also discussed.

Prerequisite: 30 points at Stage II in Philosophy

Restriction: PHIL 212

PHIL 334
15 Points

Classical Chinese Philosophy

An introduction to the philosophical thought of pre-imperial China, which forms the intellectual foundation for almost all subsequent developments in Chinese philosophy and much of Chinese culture in general. Texts studied, in translation, will include the Analects of Confucius, Mozi, Mencius, the Daodejing of Laozi, Zhuangzi, Xunzi, and Hanfeizi.

Prerequisite: 30 points at Stage II in Philosophy, or 15 points at Stage II in Philosophy and 15 points from ASIAN 100, CHINESE 130, JAPANESE 150 or KOREAN 120

Restriction: PHIL 214

PHIL 335
15 Points

20th Century French Philosophy

An examination of the development of contemporary French philosophy through the intellectual movements of Existentialism, Phenomenology, Structuralism and Post-Structuralism.

Prerequisite: 30 points at Stage II in Philosophy, or EUROPEAN 100 and 15 points at Stage II in Philosophy

Restriction: PHIL 215

PHIL 337
15 Points

Philosophy of Law

Themes in contemporary Western philosophy of law, relating to debates between liberal and non-liberal conceptions of law, including questions about the nature of legal rules, legal reasons and the relationship between law and morality. Major positions in legal theory will be covered, from legal positivism to critical legal studies.

Prerequisite: 30 points at Stage II in Philosophy, or 15 points at Stage II in Philosophy and CRIM 201 or 202

Restriction: PHIL 217

PHIL 338
15 Points

Problems in Epistemology

Epistemology is the study of knowledge, rationality, belief and related topics. This course will give an overview of epistemology but will focus on three main issues: foundationalism versus coherentism, internalism versus externalism and replies to scepticism.

Prerequisite: 30 points at Stage II in Philosophy

Restriction: PHIL 218

PHIL 340
15 Points

Kant and Hegel

An examination of the development of German idealism from Kant to Hegel, focusing on Kant's Critique of Pure Reason (1781-1787) and Hegel's Phenomenology of Spirit (1807).

Prerequisite: 30 points at Stage II in Philosophy, or EUROPEAN 100 and 15 points at Stage II in Philosophy

Restriction: 280.312, PHIL 220

PHIL 341
15 Points

Phenomenology and Hermeneutics

Examines two waves of new philosophical thought that originated in Germany in the early Twentieth Century and gradually spread throughout the world: phenomenology and hermeneutics. Discusses key figures in these movements including Husserl, Heidegger and Gadamer, as well as a selection of others such as Dilthey, Merleau-Ponty, Levinas, Ricoeur, Habermas, Apel, Taylor or Rorty.

Prerequisite: 30 points at Stage II in Philosophy, or EUROPEAN 100 and 15 points at Stage II in Philosophy

Restriction: PHIL 221

PHIL 344
15 Points

Buddhist Philosophy

An introduction to the Buddhist tradition of philosophy, from the teachings of the Buddha to Abhidharma, Madhyamaka, Yogacara (in India, South East Asia and Tibet) and finally to Chan (China) and Zen (Japan).

Prerequisite: 30 points at Stage II in Philosophy, or 15 points at Stage II in Philosophy and 15 points from ASIAN 100, CHINESE 130, JAPANESE 150 or KOREAN 120

Restriction: PHIL 224

PHIL 345
15 Points

Power, Critique and Emancipation

An examination of support for political struggles for freedom, justice and recognition through the philosophical critique of modern society. Topics include science and technology, bureaucratisation, social control, social alienation, mass communication, the commodification of culture, and the idea of critique. Theorists may include Horkheimer, Adorno, Marcuse, Benjamin, Arendt, Habermas and Honneth.

Prerequisite: 30 points at Stage II in Philosophy

Restriction: PHIL 225

PHIL 346
15 Points

Special Topic

PHIL 348
15 Points

Special Topic: Philosophy of Atheism

Atheism has a long history of opposition to supernatural religion. Philosophy of Atheism explores this conflict along with: views of ourselves and the world once the God hypothesis is abandoned, the idea of an enlightened humanism, the nature of secularism, the rivalry between scientific and religious world views, and naturalistic explanations of religious belief.

Prerequisite: 30 points at Stage II in Philosophy or Theology or Theological and Religious Studies

Restriction: PHIL 228

PHIL 349
15 Points

Special Topic

PHIL 350
15 Points

Special Topic

PHIL 351
15 Points

Philosophy and the Environment

Philosophical questions relating to the environment and our use of it, such as the following: Do we have obligations to future generations, especially concerning preservation of the environment? What are our moral and epistemic responsibilities regarding climate change and other environmental issues? Does nature have intrinsic value? Is it better to live in a natural world or a virtual world?

Prerequisite: 30 points at Stage II in Philosophy

Restriction: PHIL 250

PHIL 360
15 Points

Philosophy of Science

What makes science a distinctive way of discovering knowledge about our world whether natural, biological or social? Ever since science started in Ancient Greece, a number of different theories about the worldview, methods and rationality of science have been proposed that distinguish it from religion, pseudo-science and myth. The course examines some of these accounts of the nature of science.

Prerequisite: 30 points at Stage II in Philosophy, or HISTORY 240 and SCIGEN 201

Restriction: PHIL 260

PHIL 361
15 Points

Metaphysical Structures of the World

Metaphysics attempts to give a quite general picture of the nature and structure of the world, and particularly investigates philosophical problems which thereby arise. Science, common sense, religions and cultures all presuppose metaphysical worldviews. Traditional metaphysical problems concern laws, causation, time, space, substance, identity, attributes and universals, free will, reality, existence etc. Course topics will be selected from such traditional problems.

Prerequisite: 30 points at Stage II in Philosophy, or 30 points from HISTORY 240, PHIL 260, SCIGEN 201

Restriction: PHIL 261

PHIL 363
15 Points

Philosophy of Biology

Examines philosophical and conceptual issues in the life sciences. Topics may include the units and levels of selection, adaptationism, the evolution of altruism, biology and ethics, sociobiology and evolutionary psychology, cultural evolution, evolution versus creationism, and the origin and nature of life.

Prerequisite: 30 points at Stage II in Philosophy, or 30 points from HISTORY 240, PHIL 260, SCIGEN 201

Restriction: PHIL 263

Postgraduate 700 Level Courses

PHIL 701
30 Points

Philosophy for Children – Theory and Practice

Provides a thorough practical grounding in facilitation of philosophical communities of inquiry, and in the construction of materials to stimulate philosophical inquiry. The educational theory and international research on cognitive and social outcomes of Philosophy for Children are explored. A selection of topics in philosophy will be studied at a level appropriate for advanced Education students encountering philosophy for the first time.

Prerequisite: Diploma in Teaching (Primary or Secondary), or equivalent

Restriction: PHIL 301

PHIL 720
30 Points

PHIL 720A
15 Points

PHIL 720B
15 Points

Special Studies

Directed study on a topic or topics approved by the Academic Head or nominee.

To complete this course students must enrol in PHIL 720 A and B, or PHIL 720

PHIL 721
30 Points

Special Topic

PHIL 722
30 Points

Special Topic

PHIL 723
30 Points

Special Topic

PHIL 724
30 Points

Special Topic

PHIL 725
30 Points

Special Topic

PHIL 726
15 Points

Ethics 1

Discussion of selected topics in Ethics.

PHIL 727
15 Points

Ethics 2

Discussion of selected topics in Ethics.

PHIL 728
15 Points

Political Philosophy 1

Discussion of selected topics in political philosophy.

PHIL 729
15 Points

Political Philosophy 2

Discussion of selected topics in political philosophy.

PHIL 730
15 Points

Philosophy of Law

Discussion of selected topics in philosophy of law.

PHIL 731
15 Points

Philosophy of the Arts 1

Discussion of selected topics in philosophy of the arts.

PHIL 732
15 Points

Philosophy of the Arts 2

Discussion of selected topics in philosophy of the arts.

PHIL 736
15 Points

Logic 1

Discussion of selected topics in logic.

PHIL 737
15 Points

Logic 2

Discussion of selected topics in logic.

PHIL 738
15 Points

Philosophical Logic

Discussion of selected topics in philosophical logic.

PHIL 739
15 Points

Philosophy of Language

Discussion of selected topics in philosophy of language.

PHIL 740
15 Points

Metaphysics 1

Discussion of selected topics in metaphysics.

PHIL 741
15 Points

PHIL 741A
7.5 Points

PHIL 741B
7.5 Points

Metaphysics 2

Discussion of selected topics in metaphysics.

To complete this course students must enrol in PHIL 741 A and B, or PHIL 741

PHIL 742
15 Points

Philosophy of Religion 1

Discussion of selected topics in philosophy of religion.

PHIL 743
15 Points

Philosophy of Religion 2

Discussion of selected topics in philosophy of religion.

PHIL 745
15 Points

Philosophy of Mind 1

Discussion of selected topics in philosophy of mind.

PHIL 746
15 Points

Philosophy of Mind 2

Discussion of selected topics in philosophy of mind.

PHIL 747
15 Points

Epistemology 1

Discussion of selected topics in epistemology.

PHIL 748
15 Points

Epistemology 2

Discussion of selected topics in epistemology.

PHIL 749
15 Points

Philosophy of Science 1

Discussion of selected topics in philosophy of science.

PHIL 750
15 Points

PHIL 750A
7.5 Points

PHIL 750B
7.5 Points

Philosophy of Science 2

Discussion of selected topics in philosophy of science.

To complete this course students must enrol in PHIL 750 A and B, or PHIL 750

PHIL 752
15 Points

Ancient/Medieval Philosophy 1

Discussion of selected topics in ancient and medieval philosophy.

PHIL 753
15 Points

Ancient/Medieval Philosophy 2

Discussion of selected topics in ancient and medieval philosophy.

PHIL 754
15 Points

History of Philosophy 1

Discussion of selected topics in the history of philosophy.

PHIL 755
15 Points

History of Philosophy 2

Discussion of selected topics in the history of philosophy.

PHIL 756
15 Points

History of Philosophy 3

Discussion of selected topics in the history of philosophy.

PHIL 757
15 Points

European Continental Philosophy 1

Discussion of selected topics in European continental philosophy.

PHIL 758
15 Points

European Continental Philosophy 2

Discussion of selected topics in European continental philosophy.

PHIL 759
15 Points

European Continental Philosophy 3

Discussion of selected topics in European continental philosophy.

PHIL 762
15 Points

God and Morality

An exploration of the relationship between God and morality. Topics may include: the role of moral claims in arguments for or against the existence of God; the impact of morality on disputes about the nature of God, and the influence of theism on the content of morality.

PHIL 763
15 Points

Special Topic: Freedom: Its Nature, Value and Future

Combines issues in metaphysics, meta-ethics, moral philosophy, philosophy of religion, and political philosophy. The unifying theme is the role of freedom in our moral lives.

PHIL 764
15 Points

Applied Ethics

Discussion of selected topics in applied ethics.

PHIL 765
15 Points

Special Topic

PHIL 766
15 Points

Special Topic: Ethics for Possible Futures

Discusses the impact on moral and political philosophy of two credible futures: a broken world damaged by climate change or other disaster; and a digital future inhabited by super-intelligent machines. How should we think about these futures? Should we welcome or fear them?

PHIL 767
15 Points

Global Justice

Examination of issues related to global justice, eg, What, if anything, are people owed as a matter of justice in the global context? Is global equality of opportunity an important ideal? Which restrictions on immigration, if any, are justified? Are protectionist policies in trade justified? How can we better assist those in poor countries who are trying to help themselves?

Restriction: PHIL 310

PHIL 768
15 Points

Special Studies

Directed study on a topic or topics approved by the Academic Head or nominee.

PHIL 769
15 Points

Special Studies

Directed study on a topic or topics approved by the Academic Head or nominee.

PHIL 770
15 Points

Special Studies: Honours

Directed study on a topic or topics approved by the Academic Head or nominee.

PHIL 771
15 Points

Special Studies: Honours

Directed study on a topic or topics approved by the Academic Head or nominee.

PHIL 772
15 Points

Special Studies: Honours

Directed study on a topic or topics approved by the Academic Head or nominee.

PHIL 773
15 Points

Special Studies: Honours

Directed study on a topic or topics approved by the Academic Head or nominee.

PHIL 774
15 Points

Special Studies: Master's

Directed study on a topic or topics approved by the Academic Head or nominee.

PHIL 775
15 Points

Special Studies: Master's

Directed study on a topic or topics approved by the Academic Head or nominee.

PHIL 776
15 Points

Special Studies: Master's

Directed study on a topic or topics approved by the Academic Head or nominee.

PHIL 777
15 Points

Special Studies: Master's

Directed study on a topic or topics approved by the Academic Head or nominee.

PHIL 782
30 Points

PHIL 782A
15 Points

PHIL 782B
15 Points

Dissertation

To complete this course students must enrol in PHIL 782 A and B, or PHIL 782

PHIL 792
45 Points

PHIL 792A
22.5 Points

PHIL 792B
22.5 Points

Dissertation

To complete this course students must enrol in PHIL 792 A and B, or PHIL 792

PHIL 796A
60 Points

PHIL 796B
60 Points

Thesis

Prerequisite: A BA(Hons) in Philosophy with at least Second Class Honours, First Division, or equivalent

To complete this course students must enrol in PHIL 796 A and B

PHIL 797A
60 Points

PHIL 797B
60 Points

Research Portfolio

To complete this course students must enrol in PHIL 797 A and B

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