Courses - Faculty of Science


Geography

Foundation Courses

GEOG 91F
15 Points

Foundation Geography 1

Introduces population and development themes, including global and regional patterns of population growth, overpopulation, migration, urbanisation, city planning issues, uneven patterns of economic growth and human well-being, and sustainable development.

Restriction: GEOG 91P

GEOG 92F
15 Points

Foundation Geography 2

Focuses on the relationship between humans and the environment, emphasising long-term trends in resource use, human impacts in the environment, sustainable resource management and environmental hazards.

Restriction: GEOG 92P

Preparatory Courses

GEOG 91P
15 Points

Preparatory Geography 1

Introduces population and development themes, including global and regional patterns of population growth, overpopulation, migration, urbanisation, city planning issues, uneven patterns of economic growth and human well-being, and sustainable development.

Restriction: GEOG 91F

GEOG 92P
15 Points

Preparatory Geography 2

Focuses on the relationship between humans and the environment, emphasising long-term trends in resource use, human impacts on the environment, sustainable resource management, and environmental hazards.

Restriction: GEOG 92F

Stage I

GEOG 101
15 Points

Earth Surface Processes and Landforms

Understanding of the functioning of natural systems at the Earth's surface and human interactions with these systems. Examines the operation and interaction between Atmospheric, Hydrological, Ecological and Geomorphic systems. Environmental processes are an integrating theme. Topics include: climate and hydrological systems, ecological processes; surface sediment cycle; and processes governing development and dynamics of major landform types.

GEOG 102
15 Points

Geography of the Human Environment

Examines the relationships among personal geographies and global geographies of uneven development, economic, environmental and socio-cultural change. Using a variety of examples from New Zealand and the world we illustrate the connection between local places and global issues.

GEOG 103
15 Points

GEOG 103G
15 Points

Mapping Our World

An introduction to contemporary geospatial technologies such as web-mapping, GPS and tracking devices (such as your phone), and GIS. Covers key concepts and principles behind these tools and their use, along with practical experiences through laboratories. Critical and theoretical perspectives on the tools, their use, and their social impacts will be discussed.

GEOG 104
15 Points

GEOG 104G
15 Points

Cities and Urbanism

What makes a great city? This course explores 'urbanism' in both historical and contemporary cities to determine the essence of urbanity and the way that citizens (and visitors) experience city life. The dynamics and character of cities are considered in terms of their built environment, environmental systems, population, social diversity, and planning policies and practices.

Stage II

GEOG 202
15 Points

Cities, Regions and Communities

A critical examination of geographic processes and consequences in contemporary society. Topics are selected from the instructors' research interests, which include: the transformation of urban places and spaces; the forms and location of industries and retailing; social geographies of the city; New Zealand's linkages with the global economy and society; urban historical geographies; and demographic and social changes in New Zealand and the Pacific region.

Prerequisite: 60 points

GEOG 205
15 Points

Environment and Society

A critical exploration of the interconnectedness of environment and society. The course highlights the importance of understanding how different views and attitudes influence people's interactions with the environment. Key themes include governance, management and development, which are addressed through issues such as conservation, climate change adaptation, disasters and resource use. Classes draw on a variety of case studies from New Zealand and overseas.

Prerequisite: 60 points

GEOG 210
15 Points

Introduction to GIS and Spatial Thinking

An introduction to the conceptual base of Geographic Information Science, the practical use of geo-spatial data and various societal issues related to the use of Remote Sensing and Geographic Information Systems. The course exercises cover a range of applications of GIS for analysis and display of spatial data, focusing on non-programmable solutions.

GEOG 250
15 Points

Geographical Research in Practice

A critical exploration of the research experience in geography. Case studies and field work demonstrate approaches to understanding the complex interactions of social and environmental processes. Students will develop practical skills in problem identification, research methodologies, ethics and analytical practices.

Prerequisite: 60 points

GEOG 260
15 Points

Field Studies in Earth Surface Processes

Introduction to laboratory, field methods and analytical techniques to interpret the dynamics of Earth surface processes. Specific topics include: geomorphic mapping; landform observation and topographic survey; soil and sedimentary analyses and sampling; stratigraphic analysis; measurement of climatic, hydrological and coastal processes; and techniques for ecological measurement and monitoring.

Prerequisite: GEOG 101

Restriction: EARTHSCI 260

GEOG 261
15 Points

Climate, Hydrology and Biogeography

Exploration of themes in climatology, hydrology, and biogeography with a focus on the nature and role of key processes at various spatial and temporal scales in the biosphere. The role of climate as a fundamental driver of hydrological and biogeographical processes is an important theme.

Prerequisite: GEOG 101

Restriction: EARTHSCI 261

GEOG 262
15 Points

Geomorphology

Introduces fundamental concepts in geomorphology for geologists and physical geographers. Key aspects of geomorphology, sedimentology, and earth surface processes are introduced by studying the temporal and spatial development of coastal and river landforms. Applied techniques for earth and environmental sciences, including field, remote sensing, GIS mapping, and modelling.

Prerequisite: GEOG 101

Restriction: EARTHSCI 262

Stage III

GEOG 302
15 Points

Space, Place, Economy

Examines the spatial organisation economies and the economic production of space and place. The course enriches the study of economies and their geographies by drawing upon cultural, political and institutional theories to critically examine concepts and techniques traditionally deployed by geographers. Alternative ways of understanding and influencing economic change are considered. Novel insights are developed into New Zealand’s national and local economies.

Prerequisite: 30 points at Stage II

GEOG 305
15 Points

Population, Health and Society

A survey of major themes in population, health and social geography. An examination of the dynamics of population complements analyses of health and healthcare, the education sector, the welfare state, and the changing character of urban places.

Prerequisite: 30 points at Stage II

GEOG 307
15 Points

Urban Geography

Analysis of key processes shaping socio-cultural geographies of contemporary cities. Using international and local examples, issues such as the economy of cities, the culture of cities, home and housing, segregation and polarisation, the imaging of cities and sustainability are explored.

Prerequisite: 30 points at Stage II

GEOG 312
15 Points

Geographies of Pacific Development

Examines development processes and issues in the countries of the Pacific. Themes will include development theory, colonialism, environment, population, economic systems, migration, gender, ethnicity and identity, geopolitics and international linkages, and development strategies.

Prerequisite: 30 points at Stage II

GEOG 315
15 Points

Research Design and Methods in Human Geography

A lecture, practical and field course, the focus of which is a residential field section during the mid-semester study break. The course provides students with experience in designing and executing a research project. It is designed both to prepare students for the increasing number of jobs that require these research skills and as an introduction to research for those proceeding to higher degrees.

Prerequisite: GEOG 250 and either GEOG 202 or 205 and 15 points from GEOG 302, 305, 307, 312, 320, 322-327, 352, or equivalent

GEOG 317
15 Points

Remote Sensing and GIS

Further develops key concepts of geographic information science as it is applied to earth and environmental sciences including physical geography. Covers techniques for describing the physical environment, ways of analysing and visualising the environment, particularly raster-based surface models. Also compares theories of remote sensing from space, the air, non-imagery raster data. Skills in analysing and properly using various types of remote sensing materials are developed through labs.

Prerequisite: EARTHSCI 210, GEOG 210 or equivalent

GEOG 318
15 Points

GIS Principles and Practice

Key concepts of geographic information science and their application in diverse fields such as retailing, environmental management, population mapping, health, crime analysis, and planning. Covers techniques for visualising and describing geographical systems, ways of analysing spatial data, and the impact of recent developments in web-mapping.

Prerequisite: EARTHSCI 210, GEOG 210 or equivalent

GEOG 319
15 Points

GIS Project

Builds on materials in GEOG 317 and/or GEOG 318 by providing an opportunity for students to pursue a topic of choice through an individual project. Project topics are developed by students in conjunction with the instructors, and input and ideas from other courses is encouraged.

Prerequisite: GEOG 318 or equivalent

GEOG 320
15 Points

Resources and Environmental Management

Examines the development and conservation of the environment in its use as a resource base, with particular reference to the way in which institutional structures in society determine provision and allocation. Attention is balanced between international experience and the policy framework in New Zealand. The course provides an understanding of key concepts, practices and methods.

Prerequisite: 30 points at Stage II

GEOG 322
15 Points

Culture and Environment in East Asia

Takes a topical and regional approach to the geography of East Asia. The unity and diversity of East Asia, environment and cultural development, industrialisation and urbanisation, population problems and environmental management are emphasised.

Prerequisite: 30 points at Stage II

GEOG 324
15 Points

Critical Perspectives on Sustainable Development

A critical evaluation of the challenges of sustainable development emphasising the structural and political factors that contribute to unequal development relations. Introduces a variety of theoretical frameworks to interrogate sustainable development strategies and solutions. The course focuses on integrating research and theory into practical learning.

Prerequisite: 30 points at Stage II

GEOG 325
15 Points

The Human Dimension of Disasters

An overview of the human dimension of disasters which covers crucial concepts and theories, vulnerability and the causes of disasters, disaster risk reduction and management, post-disaster recovery and transversal issues such as culture and gender. The discussions encompass not only theoretical but also policy and practical materials and draw on examples and case studies from throughout the world with a particular focus on the most vulnerable and marginalised areas and communities.

Prerequisite: 30 points at Stage II

GEOG 327
15 Points

Politics, Markets and Economies

Uses geographical insights to explore the interrelationships between politics, economy and culture. The course focuses attention on institutions, subjectivity and the making of markets. It examines political projects and economic spaces such as higher education, food and creative economies at the regional, national, and global level.

Prerequisite: 30 points at Stage II

GEOG 328
15 Points

Special Topic

GEOG 330
15 Points

Research Methods in Physical Geography

Research design and associated research methods from the component fields of physical geography. A residential field trip forms a focus for the course. On this trip, students will work under supervision in small groups and apply selected research methods and techniques to a research project. Fieldwork will be followed by the development and presentation of the research project.

Prerequisite: 75 points above Stage I, including 15 points from EARTHSCI 201, 260-262, GEOG 260-262

GEOG 331
15 Points

Fluvial Geomorphology

An integrated study of hydrological and fluvial processes in a river basin context. Content includes interpretation of channel and floodplain landforms, flow and sediment transport relationships, and analysis of landscape evolution. Scientific principles are applied to selected practical problems.

Prerequisite: 45 points at Stage II, including EARTHSCI 262 or GEOG 262, or equivalent

GEOG 332
15 Points

Climate and Environment

Introduction to the concept that climate, although often perceived as a hazard, is in fact an important resource. Ways in which climate processes can create hazards or provide a range of resources will be explored. Knowledge concerning how observation systems and climate information can used for decision making, for example in urban planning, economic development and disaster risk reduction, will also be developed as will the procedures associated with the assessment of societal sensitivity to climate.

Prerequisite: 45 points at Stage II, including EARTHSCI 261 or GEOG 261, or equivalent

GEOG 333
15 Points

Special Topic: Field-focused Research in Earth System Science

Prerequisite: Permission of Academic Head

GEOG 334
15 Points

Environmental Change

An exploration of the nature and causes of change in selected aspects of the physical environment. Key themes are: a) natural processes driving environmental change and variability; b) humans as agents of change, and; c) biophysical and societal sensitivity to change. Course content will include past, present, and future interactions between society and environmental change, with examples primarily drawn from climatology, hydrology/water resources, and ecology.

Prerequisite: 45 points at Stage II, including EARTHSCI 261 or GEOG 261, or equivalent

GEOG 342
15 Points

Technology, Society and Environment

A nuanced examination of the relationships between intersections and articulations of technology (hardware, software, infrastructures, and data), society, and the environment. This course adopts a critical geography perspective that understands and asks students to reflect on the ways in which technologies are social practices that have profound societal and environmental consequences. The course engages with themes such as social media and cities, the surveillance society, digital social inequality, cultural geographies of internet infrastructures, and energy requirements of ‘the cloud’.

Prerequisite: 45 points at Stage II

GEOG 351
15 Points

Coastal and Marine Studies

Focuses on the development of coastal landforms across a range of temporal and spatial scales. Introduces natural processes such as waves, tides and circulation, as well as geological-scale coastal evolution driven by changes in sea level and sediment supply. The course has an applied focus with specific emphasis on coastal management problems that affect society. Issues considered include coastal erosion during storms, the impacts of shoreline engineering, climate change and accelerating sea level rise.

Prerequisite: 45 points at Stage II, including EARTHSCI 262 or GEOG 262, or equivalent

GEOG 352
15 Points

Landscape, Environment and Heritage

An examination of environmental change from a historical geography perspective. Approaches to investigating and understanding the transformation of environments are explored, and processes driving creation of different types of landscapes including heritage places are considered. The course enables students to place the modern environment within a historical context.

Prerequisite: 30 points at Stage II

GEOG 362
15 Points

Environmental Hydrology

An exploration of the physical science underpinning hydrology. Hydrological pathways are used to examine rainfall-runoff with links made to water quality and eco-hydrology. There is a particular focus on the hydrological impact of urban development and attempts to understand and implement water sensitive cities.

Prerequisite: 15 points from GEOG 101, ENVSCI 101; 15 points from GEOG 201, 250, 261 or 331

GEOG 399
15 Points

Capstone: Geography

An engagement with the research process, as practised in geography. Students will undertake an independent research project and communicate their findings, with due attention to research design, methodology, research ethics, information sources, field practise, data analysis, and research communication. Independent or small group research projects may involve residential or local fieldwork, laboratory analysis, desktop analysis or other research activities.

Prerequisite: 30 points at Stage III in Geography

Diploma Courses

GEOG 690
30 Points

GEOG 690A
15 Points

GEOG 690B
15 Points

Graduate Diploma Dissertation (Geography)

To complete this course students must enrol in GEOG 690 A and B, or GEOG 690

Postgraduate 700 Level Courses

GEOG 701
15 Points

Research in Practice

A reflection on the process of developing research projects from theory to methods, analysis, and the presentation of findings. Attention is directed to the ways in which research is shaped by intellectual histories, pressing social and environmental challenges, and contemporary academic and political debates. The course allows students to develop specialised interests in geography or environmental management.

GEOG 711
15 Points

Emerging Economic Spaces

Examines globalising economic processes, localising forces, and the practices of economic actors in the production of emerging economic spaces. The course considers contemporary analytical and conceptual debates, including global value chains, geographic imaginaries, new economies, and diverse economies.

GEOG 712
15 Points

Land, Place and Culture

Contemporary geographic perspectives on society and culture, focusing on a review of traditional and new cultural geographic approaches to the constructions of place and environment, ethnicity, gender and identity. No formal prerequisite, but an understanding of material in Stage III courses in human geography will be assumed.

GEOG 714
15 Points

Population, Mobilities and Wellbeing

An exploration of the changing nature of human populations, the dynamics of human mobilities, the determinants of health status and evolving modes of healthcare provision. No formal prerequisite, but an understanding of material in Stage III courses in human geography will be assumed.

GEOG 715
15 Points

Development and New Regional Geographies

'Development' is place-dependent and takes place at a range of scales. This course considers economic, socio-cultural, geopolitical and environmental transformations of nations, regions, communities, and emerging or post-foundational political spaces focussing on examples from Pacific, Asia and New Zealand.

GEOG 717
15 Points

Contemporary Issues in Human Geography

A critical review of selected issues and debates in contemporary human geography.

GEOG 718
15 Points

Urban Worlds

An exploration of contemporary debates in urban theory and research. This course critically examines contemporary processes of urbanisation and imaginings of city futures. Particular emphasis is placed on interrogating questions about urbanisation through a comparative lens, exploring the different geographies of urban life and politics that emerge in cities across the planet.

GEOG 719
15 Points

Geographies of Housing and Urban Change

Advanced study of housing and urban issues, including the topics of homeownership, asset-based welfare, the politics of housing affordability, housing reforms and the changing dynamics of gentrification. Contemporary issues such as mortgage market dynamics and social rented housing reforms are examined. The course will consider also urban governance, office property investment and development processes, and sites of consumption and spectacle.

GEOG 725
15 Points

People, Participation and Development

A critical overview of issues associated with people’s participation in development in their geographical context, including processes and outcomes, accountability, empowerment and transformation in the context of livelihood strengthening, resource management, health and sanitation, education and disaster risk reduction. The course provides the students with theoretical knowledge but also practical skills through the use in class of participatory tools as both contents and teaching aids. Discussions rely upon concrete examples from throughout the world with a particular focus on marginalised places.

GEOG 730
15 Points

Climate Change: Past, Present, and Future

An exploration of the character and causes of past, present, and future climate change. Content includes examination of how and where climate is (or is not) currently changing, and uncertainties associated with future projections. The temporal focus will be on the Holocene and the Anthropocene, through to the end of the twenty-first century. A human society context will feature throughout.

GEOG 737
15 Points

Policy and Expertise

Exploring ‘policy’ — an all too familiar and taken for granted term — by focusing on how policies get made, how different actors and varieties of expertise influence the policy process, and how policies shape people and place. It introduces students to transdisciplinary conversations involving geographers, anthropologists, sociologists and urbanists.

GEOG 738
15 Points

Future Food and Biological Economies

Investigates contemporary understandings, issues and strategies relating to the development of biological economies and food networks in the context of the globalising food economy. Addresses transformations in agro-food complexes and questions of nature-society relationships to do with 'sustainable' and 'resilient' food production and consumption.

GEOG 739
15 Points

Research Topics in Geography

Directed research on an approved topic or topics.

Prerequisite: Approval of the Programme Coordinator

GEOG 745
15 Points

Applied Fluvial Geomorphology

Catchment-scale perspectives are used to analyse spatial and temporal variability in river forms and processes. River responses to disturbance are placed in a longer-term evolutionary context. Prospective river futures are appraised using field analyses and numerical modelling applications. These principles and techniques are used to discuss management options. No formal prerequisite but final year undergraduate experience in a related field required.

GEOG 746
15 Points

Applied Coastal Geomorphology

An advanced course on the process-form relationships that shape coastlines over a range of spatial and temporal scales. Coastal processes are examined with field experiments in which principles of experiment design and field deployment are demonstrated. Long-term evolutionary perspectives are examined using a range of field techniques. These short- and long-term approaches are then merged to address examples of applied coastal management problems. No formal prerequisite but an understanding equivalent to GEOG 351 will be assumed.

GEOG 748
15 Points

Current Issues in Coastal Management

Critical consideration of contemporary issues in coastal management. Topics may include: competition for coastal space and resources; vulnerability of coastal communities to climatic variability; scientific uncertainty in the decision making process; understanding the legacies of past planning decisions. Case studies are used to explore complexities of the physical and social dimensions of coastal management approaches within the context of current regulatory frameworks.

GEOG 749
15 Points

Climate and Society

An examination of inter-relationships between climate and society. The sensitivity of selected biophysical and human activity systems to climate will be investigated and the actual and potential impacts of climatic variability and change investigated. Impact themes will vary from year to year, but are likely to be drawn from hydrology and water resources, agriculture, human health, ecosystems, and energy. No formal prerequisite but an understanding equivalent to GEOG 332 will be assumed.

GEOG 750
15 Points

Environment and Landscape

Environmental change in New Zealand since European settlement, including exploitation of natural resources, the creation of different cultural landscapes, and recognition of places as natural and cultural heritage. Different approaches to investigating and understanding recent environmental change are addressed. The course is suitable for physical and social science students, and will enable them to place the modern environment within a historical context. The course may include short guided walks and a one day or two half-day fieldtrips.

GEOG 759
15 Points

Research Topics in Geography

Directed research on an approved topic or topics.

Prerequisite: Approval of the Programme Coordinator

GEOG 760
15 Points

Directed Study in Geography

Directed studies on an approved topic or topics.

Prerequisite: Academic Head approval

GEOG 761
15 Points

Special Topic

GEOG 770
15 Points

GIS and Spatial Data Handling

Advances spatial data handling, visualisation, and analysis methods as components of GIS as a methodology for approaching spatial problems (planning, resource management, spatial decision support, etc.) in Geography, providing postgraduate students with the ability to develop transferrable skillsets that they can use to support their independent research projects. No formal prerequisites but an understanding of introductory geographic information science equivalent to GEOG 210 or 242 will be presumed.

Restriction: GEOG 318

GEOG 771
15 Points

Spatial Analysis and Geocomputation

Approaches and challenges to analysing spatial data. Specific techniques covered will include measures of spatial autocorrelation, geographical regression, point pattern analysis, interpolation, overlay analysis, and an introduction to some of the newer geocomputation methods such as neural networks and cellular automata. Students will conduct a significant analysis task as part of this course. No formal prerequisite but an understanding equivalent to GEOG 318 or GISCI 342 will be assumed.

GEOG 772
15 Points

Advanced Raster Data Analysis

Concepts and theories underpinning digital analysis of raster data, including remotely sensed data, LiDAR data and digital elevation models. Sources, nature and accuracy of raster data, analysis and integration of raster data from diverse sources, and applications of raster data analysis in hydrology and environmental modelling. No formal prerequisite but an understanding equivalent to GEOG 317 or GISCI 341 will be assumed.

GEOG 773
15 Points

Visualisation and Cartography

Introduction to field of cartography, drawing contrasts with new approaches to geovisualisation facilitated by information visualisation and statistical graphics. Human perceptual and cognitive systems as related to visual displays. Principles of sound perceptual and cognitive map design. Planning, creation and delivery of cartographic and visualisation-based projects. Review of emerging and future trends in this fast-changing field.

GEOG 774
15 Points

Advanced Spatial Data Handling

Advanced approaches to spatial data handling (processing, management, visualisation, and analysis) in web-based environments, including theoretical debates and implications as well as applications for spatial data handling in integrated open-source and web-based mapping/GIS environments. There will be an applied laboratory component and lecture/seminar component where the broader social and theoretical implications of developments in spatial data handling will be engaged. No formal prerequisite, but an understanding equivalent to GEOG 318 will be assumed.

GEOG 779
15 Points

Programming, GIS Customisation and Web-mapping

Spatial databases, spatial data structures and algorithms and converting and handling spatial data. Introduction to programming (in Python). Principles of object- and component-oriented architectures including details relating to ArcGIS as an example. Open source and open standards, web-mapping as a case-study. No formal prerequisite but 15 points from GEOG 317-319, 342, GISCI 341-343 or equivalent will be assumed.

GEOG 789
30 Points

GEOG 789A
15 Points

GEOG 789B
15 Points

Honours Dissertation in Geography

To complete this course students must enrol in GEOG 789 A and B, or GEOG 789

GEOG 796A
60 Points

GEOG 796B
60 Points

Masters Thesis in Geography

To complete this course students must enrol in GEOG 796 A and B

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